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Boost Your Scholarly Profile: Home

 

Let Your Librarian Work For You

Finding success with boosting your online digital identity, and telling YOUR research story, is finding your library and the librarians there to help you every step of the way.

This guide is designed as a step by step process to help any faculty member of the UTA community take the necessary steps to begin creating and broadening their scholarly impact.  This guide utilizes different methods to assess current online impact and then boost that impact to a higher level.  Using a variety of in library resources and open access online resources, scholars should have the tools necessary to disseminate their research to a broader audience and have a far reaching digital identity. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Digital Identity and Impact Services

Researchers are increasingly being asked to demonstrate the impact of their work whether it be for grants, promotion and tenure, accreditation or to broaden exposure of research to the academy and community at large.


This guide will serve as an introduction to a new service offered by the Faculty Services & Online Engagement department of UTA Libraries and as a resource for faculty who prefer to independently gather the data themselves.

The service and this guide will provide suggestions and tools to show research impact in a variety of ways. The service offers faculty the following:

  1. a 30 to 45 minute consultation for us to learn more about your interests and priorities (optional)
  2. Discussion on the positives and negatives about the different research metrics
  3. Sharing ideas and tools to enhance your digital reputation & increase dissemination of your work.
  4. Post-consultation follow-up with a customized research metrics report, including:
  • A comprehensive list of your publications and the number of times those publications have been cited 
  • Calculation of your h-Index: a measure of the cumulative impact of a researcher's publications
  • Journal impact factor
  • Article views (number of times abstracts, HTML versions, and PDFs are viewed
  • Social Media, blogs and online communities' activity such as: ResearchGate, Academia.edu, Facebook, and Twitter to guage early interest by other scholars ahead of the publishing and citing cycle, which can be extremely slow.